Commuter Transit Station

Chicago, Illinois / United States of America

The design for this commuter rail station responds to the need for transparency and safety, and reflects the spirit, energy and dynamic street life of the surrounding neighborhood, where there is no preponderant architectural style, but rather, a mix of forms and motifs.

The station is conceived as an adaptation of traditional stations found throughout Chicagoland, but here, (roman) brick, limestone and concrete are employed in an informal composition with contemporary detailing and construction techniques. The design evokes a sense of movement through playful massing of and openings in the facade. The form is an "inhabitable façade" of sorts, where walls turn into benches providing respite for riders as they wait for trains. The building composition is anchored by a strong vertical element - an interpretation of clock towers often found on historic stations - that provides visibility to the neighborhood and approaching pedestrians. The thin roofline is a horizontal thread that weaves in and out, tying the "pieces" of the facade together.

Inside, spaces are animated by punches, gaps, and pauses in the masonry envelope that frame views to the neighborhood rooftops and downtown skyline beyond, and create interesting light and shadow patterns across wall and floor surfaces.



Architect of record

Thomas Hoepf, FAIA
exp US Services
205 North Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60601, USA
Phone: 312.616.7379
thomas.hoepf@exp.com

Photographer

Thomas Hoepf, FAIA
exp US Services
205 North Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60601, USA
Phone: 312.616.7379
thomas.hoepf@exp.com